Hamilton County hosts women’s suffrage history of its own

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Plainsman Museum archives trace local developments back to the early 1900s

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  • Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress archives // National Woman’s Party members standing in line with banners during the dedication ceremonies for the Alva E. Belmont House, 1922. Among the banners are those reading “Nebraska,” “California Republic,” Connecticut.”
    Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress archives // National Woman’s Party members standing in line with banners during the dedication ceremonies for the Alva E. Belmont House, 1922. Among the banners are those reading “Nebraska,” “California Republic,” Connecticut.”
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Historically rich in more ways the one can count, Hamilton County has seen many milestone moments in its history -- including touches on the crusade for women’s right to vote.
A rather small file in a large filing cabinet at the Plainsman Museum in Aurora is unassumingly titled “Women’s Suffragate.” Despite being less fleshed out in content than some of the other collections of history at the museum, it holds snapshots of one of the most pivotal times in American history and reports from local newspapers on how it touched this rural county. 

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