Commentary

Wed
08
Nov

Two closet halves are never equal between husband, wife

Does “the man of the house” have too much . . . or not enough closet space in his home?
That debate between husband and wife has gone on for years in our own household and I am sure in most homes the same scene has been repeated. To those engaged in the dilemma it will come as no surprise which spouse wins the one-sided debate.
In our household with four full-sized (and full) closets plus two coat closets near our front and back doors, there is more than ample evidence the Betterhalf is the dominant head of our house. Her clothing occupies 60 percent of our joint bedroom closet; all of a guest bedroom closet; and 50 percent of my basement office closet. I should also add my “half” of the basement office closet space is confined to four shirts, two jackets, office supplies and household records.

Wed
08
Nov

Veterans, families deserve nation’s heart-felt gratitude

Thank you, veterans.
That simple, heartfelt message rings throughout America this week as we honor the men and women who are now serving our nation, as well as all those who have ever worn the uniform on our behalf. We, as a nation, simply can’t thank you enough for the sacrifices you and your families have made.
Respect and admiration for our troops, past and present, has grown noticeably stronger in recent years. Whether you are at a sporting event, community parade or small family gathering, when veterans are recognized there is a sincere sense of oneness in the air. It’s a powerful emotion, as it should be, reminding us all that we are proud to be Americans.

Wed
01
Nov

Halloween filled with treats, no tricks

Well, I’m a day late. Because I try to write a column a week early, Halloween snuck up on me. It’s not that you missed on something spectacular. But there were few of my Halloween memories that got jogged my memory. This year’s Halloween varied somewhat of Halloween’s past.
The cast for this year’s Halloween reflected some world and national situations that should be classified under the heading of a “National Halloween” and something that took away some of the luster of a genuine local Halloween and the antics of spooks and goblins. The Halloween of 2017 maybe should have been tabbed more of a “National – International Disaster” rather than fun-filled Halloween of our nation.

Wed
01
Nov

Solar WWTP project sheds energy-saving light on Aurora

The sun is shining brightly on Aurora’s wastewater treatment plant, in more ways than one.
Last week’s open house and information tour marked the completion of a two-year effort to build a solar plant designed to convert the sun’s energy into power for the city’s wastewater treatment plant. It’s an innovative concept, putting Aurora on the map yet again as a statewide leader.
Rich Melcher, who served as the city’s utility superintendent for many years before stepping into the city administrator’s role, deserves credit for his vision on this project. Melcher said he’s been thinking about the concept for nearly a decade and first tried to figure out a way to use methane gas as an alternative power source. When that didn’t pencil out, he shifted his focus to wind and solar, eventually creating a partnership that led to the solar solution.

Wed
25
Oct

When it’s time for new drapes, don’t argue

This past week the Betterhalf moved me into the interior business when she announced she was going to get new drapes for our living room windows. Naturally I never noticed we needed new drapes. Our livingroom is mostly used only when we host visitors and I don’t recall any of them saying, “Boy, do your drapes look bad!”
The Betterhalf adamantly differed with my opinion and questioned my eyesight as well. “You realize the drapes have been hanging there for nearly 30 years.” She continued by pointing out the draw cords were broken; the curtains were faded; and the sheers had been removed years previous.
It was pretty obvious I was going to be on the losing side. I didn’t ask what new drapery would cost. However, I found that question was incidental . . . new drapery is on the way and don’t ask any more questions.

Wed
25
Oct

Boots on the ground workers the backbone of our community

They are the foundation of the business world.
Ask any entrepreneur, corporate executive or local manager what makes or breaks the bottom line and you’ll get the same answer no matter what the industry, current economic climate or location. It’s the people, the boots on the ground workforce, that get things done.
The hard-working men and women who turn the soil, manage the store, teach our children, fix our vehicles and in various ways keep the economic engine of Hamilton County humming along are indeed the backbone of our community, state and nation. It’s fitting and oh so important to tip the hat once in a while to the local workforce, which we’re proud to do with a special section in this week’s News-Register.

Wed
18
Oct

Wearing black against Badgers didn’t ensure win

A few weeks ago, Husker fans were asked to have a “Black-out” stadium and wear black instead of red when we faced the powerful red and white Wisconsin Badgers in Lincoln. I’m an old traditional red and white team fan and after all, it’s our home field and we can wear what we want. Needless to say, I had a problem being asked to show Husker black support when the event was on our home field. The problem was we faced a powerful Wisconsin Badger team who was also recognized as Red and White and it was quite embarrassing to me as home fans who felt there must be some home field advantage available and also needed all the advantages we could gather.

Wed
18
Oct

Nebraska by Heart pieces find appropriate home in Aurora

Aurora has heart.
Two giant fiberglass hearts, actually, simultaneously reflecting the community’s artistic flare and pieces linked to the state’s sesquicentennial celebration.
Thanks to the imagination and quick thinking of Aurora’s Tammy Morris, an effort to participate in the Nebraska by Heart auction caught fire just in the nick of time.
As reported in this week’s edition, Morris floated the idea of raising funds to purchase one of the unique art pieces to the Aurora Rotary Club, then expanded the reach to local foundations. This community has a long, proud history of getting behind good ideas, so it’s not surprising that Morris had $5,000 in her bidding budget in a very short time. As it turns out, that was enough to buy two heart-shaped pieces, which was an added bonus.

Wed
11
Oct

Lawmakers could take a page out of the book of penance

A child expert says that playing the saxophone or piano will keep the youngsters from becoming juvenile delinquents. We also understand it will  teach them how to live alone and like it.
***
I smiled the other evening when I watched the Wells Fargo chief executive try to defend his bank against criticism from lawmakers that the mega bank has not done enough to reform itself since admitting last year it had opened millions of fake accounts customers didn’t want.
As the chief executive pointed out, he too was angry how the bank had handled these problems and now has overhauled its community banking division; ditched aggressive sales goals; released some employees; and taken other steps.
My smile came when several senators who were questioning him seemed to believe that the changes were not sufficient and the bank was willing to abuse customers and even bank employees.

Wed
11
Oct

Hometown girl does Aurora proud in bright lights of NYC

Broadway came to Aurora Sunday with a world-class musical performance from a hometown girl who found and followed her passion.
Local native Tereasa Payne delighted a crowd of approximately 200 people at the Plainsman Museum, sharing insight into her unique world through the sounds of the world’s second oldest instrument. Flutes, she explained in a captivating 90-minute performance, are found on every continent and in almost every culture of the world, dating back some 43,000 years.
It’s easy to see why Tereasa has become so successful in her field after watching and listening to her Sunday afternoon. She practices constantly in her tiny 500 sq. ft. Manhattan apartment, honing what she humbly calls “a little bit of talent” into a regular seat on the world’s biggest musical stage.

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