Commentary

Wed
11
Nov

How to tell when you are getting older

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 The other morning having coffee with a group it was apparent age was important after one mentioned he had a birthday coming up. It appeared to me after the honoree stated his age, the conversation around the table centered on who was the oldest.
Prior to become president, Ronald Reagan once made the comment, “Middle age is when you are faced with two temptations and you take the one that gets you home before 10 p.m.”
There are other ways you can know when you’re getting old. I’ve been told you are getting old if . .
• Your train of thought derails regularly.
• It takes two attempts to get off the couch.
• Rather than simply walk over and change the channel you spend 10 minutes looking for the remote control instead.
• You tell someone the same joke he told you the day before.
• You start reading the newspaper obituaries.
• You hear a telephone ringing on TV and you get up to answer yours.

Wed
04
Nov

Legacy lives on

Harold “Doc” Edgerton would be so proud.
The small-town science center which bears his name was recognized as the outstanding tourism attraction last week by the Nebraska Tourism Commission. That’s a giant feather in the cap for this unique facility and its host community, reflecting the passion Edgerton had for science as well as his genuine desire to inspire the next generation of scientists with hands-on learning. When Doc Edgerton died, he left a legacy as a pioneering scientist whose curiosity led to inventions that impacted the world. He truly loved to teach science, and believed that by touching and feeling different aspects of the scientific realm, young minds could be inspired.

Wed
04
Nov

Big Red turns into ‘Big Black’ for the Huskers

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A man’s trade often puts a mark on him, according to a professor who spent considerable time studying for the signs. You’ve heard of trumpet player’s lip and some even have found violinist acne, which creates a lump under the neck near the jaw.
He noted boxers are marked with cauliflower ears while a worker will have callus on a hand from repeated manual labor. Handling rough bricks has claimed to scrape the fingerprints off the left hand of some bricklayers. Stained fingers are the mark of other tradesmen.
Bakers, fry cooks and fish dealers carry the odors of their trades. But, the professor said when applying the last rule of odor relating to a trade, you’ve got to be careful. The smell of a barroom does not necessarily denote a bartender.
***

Wed
28
Oct

Local workforce the backbone of Hamilton County economy

Long ago I heard the theory that “location, location, location” is what makes or breaks many businesses, but the older I get the more I’m convinced that “people, people, people” have more to do with the bottom line than any other single factor.
The hard-working men and women who turn the soil, manage the store, fix our vehicles and in various ways keep the economic engine of Hamilton County humming along are the backbone of our community. It’s fitting and oh so important to tip the hat once in a while to the local workforce, which we’re proud to do with a special section in this week’s News-Register.

Wed
28
Oct

Men know their place, and it’s not in the kitchen

A comment from a female acquaintance told me, “When men reach their sixties and retire, they go to pieces; however women go right on cooking.’’ I’m long past the sixties and by what I have observed over the past decades, she has a point.
I recently helped at a church festival luncheon and I can attest the women who were there, or at least who provided food, have gone right on cooking . . . and darn good cooking. I saw no males in the kitchen. We males were humbled to picking up food trays, pouring tea, coffee, or water; and basically shuttled out of the way of those who knew what cooking was all about. And judging from the number of pies, salads and the aroma of yum-burgers, those gals in attendance knew exactly what cooking was all about.

Wed
21
Oct

New Ford dealership a nice upgrade to Aurora’s front door

You never forget a first impression.
Aurora’s first impression on Interstate 80 motorists just got better with last week’s debut of the new Friesen Ford dealership. It’s a positive sign to see a locally owned business up the ante with such a first-class facility and we tip the hat to owner Jason Friesen for making such a large commitment, not to mention a $2-plus million investment, in our community.
The Ford dealership has a lot of significant history in Aurora, dating back to the late Ken Wortman’s decision to begin selling cars on Highway 34 in 1953. Aurora was fortunate to have such a visionary entrepreneur at the helm for all those years, and equally fortunate to have a young man with a family heritage deeply rooted in automobile sales and service purchase the business a few years ago. It was a smooth transition of the dealership, keeping the Ford flag flying in Aurora, which is no guarantee these days in rural America.

Wed
21
Oct

Cleaning up for company

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It appears I may have backed myself into a corner and now have a full-time Monday morning job in our household.
When at the cabin in Minnesota I take on a couple of household duties to help the betterhalf. Our cabin is absent an automatic dishwasher in the kitchen and the betterhalf has a few other household inconveniences she does not face when at our home in Aurora.
To lighten her load I run the vacuum on Monday morning at the cabin and dry dishes up to three times a day. I am pleased to do those chores for her and offer my assistance. After all, she should be able to enjoy the summer at the cabin, too.
Upon returning home this fall I assumed our automatic dishwasher would eliminate one of my chores and others would also be taken care of by the conveniences in our Aurora home. I discovered that hasn’t been the case.

Wed
14
Oct

Constant change

Technology continues to change our world on a seemingly daily basis, and as of next week the News-Register will reflect that continuing evolution once again.
After years and years of publishing a four-page television programming guide each week in this newspaper, the ink-on-print version of Mid-State Community TV’s channel guide will no longer be available as of next week. We’re sad to see it go.
The News-Register and Hamilton Telecommunications have been partners in this project for so many years it’s hard to know exactly when the TV channel guide first started appearing. It dates back to the company’s basic cable programming, which was replaced in 2014 with a conversion to a high-tech digital IPTV product called Cobalt TV.

Wed
14
Oct

Loyal Husker fans being tested by early losses

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The early season exploits of the Cornhusker football team have challenged even the most ardent of its fan support. My betterhalf, who is among the strongest of the strong Husker fan base, is feeling and has begun to vent her frustration of three early losses.
 In all fairness to her, I sensed a slight waive in her enthusiasm a year ago when she decided to give up two of her four Husker football tickets, but did keep her two prime seats and continued to be a Husker donor. She shrugged off and denied any idea she had lost some support for her team by explaining her grandkids couldn’t attend games on a regular basis and it was too much hassle to get rid of the “extra tickets.”

Wed
07
Oct

Depth and detail

Local, local local.
Newspapering is all about local content these days, providing news, information and editorial insight focused on your hometown, your neighbors, your school, and our shared ag-based roots in rural Nebraska.
That mission hasn’t changed over the last century, though our industry most certainly has. Welcome to the new normal.
Newspapers across the country are joining hands this week in a celebration of National Newspaper Week. “Power of the Press,” a phrase etched in The Fourth Estate’s proud history, is every bit as relevant today as it was 20 years ago, though the information game has changed dramatically.
As we mark the 75th anniversary of this national celebration, I firmly believe the News-Register’s future is as bright as it has ever been. I say that not just as a co-publisher in a vibrant community, but as an interested information consumer.

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