Commentary

Wed
08
Jun

Homework time

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Conversation continues to stir in Aurora and Hamilton County regarding the prospect of building large wind turbines as a source of green energy and property tax relief.
As we noted in this space last week, reaction to this concept is mixed, with some very much in favor of the 21st Century technology and some very much against it. Personal perspective has an awful lot to do, and understandably so, with the proximity of proposed 400-plus foot wind turbines to neighboring homes and farms.
Hamilton County planners hit the pause button after a May 17 public hearing, voting to take some extra time in order for commissioners to go see for themselves what these projects look like. That made a lot of sense. Judging the sound wind turbines make and viewing their impact on the landscape is a very subjective process, so the best way to evaluate what they look and sound like is for commissioners to go take a look up close and personal.

Wed
08
Jun

Senior citizens enjoy coffee club conversation

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Several couples from Lincoln visited us this past week and complimented on our fine community. They questioned just what we did daily and as we explained our activities I pointed out having coffee with friends at least once a day.
Actually, I was ashamed to admit sometimes that total could reach three times daily. Attempting to cover my embarrassment, I did point out there was more than coffee clubbing in our community and mentioned civic club involvement, volunteerism and other activities for senior citizens.
However, the coffee club statement began to haunt me and I began to think back and realized “coffeeing” was something most all of us had grown up with. In our younger days it was coke after school with friends at a kid’s hangout called, “Wimpy’s Inn.”

Wed
01
Jun

‘Not in my back yard’

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The prospect of allowing 400-plus foot wind turbines to be erected in Hamilton County is stirring emotion and debate in our community on an issue that deserves thorough review.
The arguments for and against wind energy development both have merit, though the reaction to the concept has an awful lot to do with where you live and how you side when the issues of green energy versus personal property rights don’t align. Both perspectives have a lot of merit, frankly, though at its very core the conversation invites conflicting viewpoints.
There didn’t appear to be a lot of middle ground in a crowd of approximately 75 people at a May 17 public hearing in Aurora. Those who spoke were either very much in favor of harnessing the wind as a natural resource, or dead set against building giant towers that would change the landscape and potentially cause health, aerial safety and property value concerns.

Wed
01
Jun

Harry Truman refused to sell his presidency

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Picked this info up the other day and thought that you’d enjoy this. It’s one you might want your children and grandchildren to remember. They won’t believe this could have happened “way back then,” but it actually did!
“Harry Truman was a different kind of president. He probably made as many, or more important decisions regarding our nation’s history as any of the other 42 presidents preceding him. However, a measure of his greatness may rest on what he did after he left the White House.
The only asset he had when he died was the house he lived in. His wife had inherited the house from her mother and father and other than their years in the White House, they lived their entire lives there.
When he retired from office in 1952 his income was a U.S. Army pension reported to have been $13,507.72 a year. Congress, noting that he was paying for his stamps and personally licking them, granted him an ‘allowance’ and later a pension of $25,000 per year.

Wed
25
May

Taking a peak into the different generations

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A young man was asked how old he was. He replied, “That’s hard to say. According to my latest school tests, I have a psychological age of 11 and a moral age of 10. Anatomically, I’m 7; mentally I’m 9. But I suppose you refer to my chronological age. That’s 8 – but nobody pays any attention to that nowadays.”   
We’ll, that’s the situation I’m in after reading a newspaper that said I’m classified as a member of the Silent Generation. There are about 29 million of us and we were born between 1928-1945. We’ve been tagged as “silent because of our conformist and civic instincts and are children of parents who went through the Great Depression and WWII.”
I am sure it’s hard to believe you find me being classified as a part of the “silent” generation. Put your mind at ease because basically I had qualified by falling in the middle of pack ‘cause I was born in 1938.

Wed
25
May

Giltner girls, High Plains boys share the spotlight with class

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A day filled with drama ended with the classiest of gestures Saturday in Omaha, and a photo opp that speaks far more than 1,000 words.
Two teams linked to Hamilton County stood proud atop the podium at Omaha Burke Stadium having earned the titles of state track team champions. The Giltner girls brought home the trophy for the second year in a row, sending a message with a young, talented roster that the Lady Hornets may well be the team to beat next year as well. Coach Nancy Lockmon, assistant coaches and the entire team have reason to be extremely proud.

Wed
18
May

GOP uncertainty

Last week’s Nebraska primary was an exercise in futility as far as the race for the White House. Never before have so many walked out of a voting booth so thoroughly disappointed in our choices.
As a registered Republican, my options, and those of a majority of others here in Nebraska and Hamilton County, were Ben Carson, Ted Cruz, John Kasich, Marco Rubio or Donald Trump. Unless you’re living under a rock, you know that there was only one man officially left in the race by the time Nebraskans weighed in, which meant our vote had no impact whatsoever.
It still mattered, however, as a personal statement of who we want to see as our next president. It’s a very big deal, in my opinion, to be part of the electoral process and to do your civic duty and vote.

Wed
18
May

Giving a shout-out to the local foundations

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. . . And the beat goes on. That’s how I look at my surroundings and realize our community continues to grow through present and past generous citizens who have or are currently reinvesting in Aurora and Hamilton County.
Aurora’s numerous foundations – both community and individual -- have contributed millions of dollars to projects from which we all are able to benefit.
 What is more impressive is the fact more private foundations are being established and the granddaddy of local foundations, The Hamilton Community Foundation, continues to grow. It would be difficult for most communities the size of Aurora and Hamilton County to match our growth and the generosity of past and present citizenry.

Thu
12
May

Making hot sandwiches the perfect picnic dish

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This week’s recipe is something many of you probably have already made or at least know how to make. In that case, I am really just providing you with a newspaper recipe card to cut out!
 I was inspired to try my hand at making these scrumptious little sandwiches after Nitta’s Catering served them at a couple of AACD Lunch and Learn sessions and also after watching a recent episode of The Pioneer Woman, where she did the same thing but with a slight spin.
I went back and forth on which recipe to make, the original or the Ree Drummond version, but after asking my taste tester (my husband), he opted for the original. He had never had either before so he wanted to try the original first.
As coincidence would have it, we helped some friends move a couch this weekend and what was she serving for lunch but hot Hawaiian ham and swiss sandwiches. So Jeremy got a sneak peak at the taste and was happy with his decision of choosing the original.

Thu
12
May

‘Creativity never ends’

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You don’t have to look hard for creative influence at Aurora Public Schools. It is painted all over the walls, quite literally.
Last week’s debut of not one but two large, collaborative murals offered visual confirmation that the fine arts are alive and well here in Aurora. Our community has a strong and well-deserved reputation for its artistic flare, and this unique project demonstrates that the seeds of creativity are being planted and nurtured at a very young age.
Sarah Wegenast deserves best of show honors for her drive to make this mural project come to life. Wegenast, who showed why she was honored in recent years as the Nebraska art teacher of the year, had a vision three years ago to pursue this massive undertaking, then set about making it happen.

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