Commentary

Wed
14
Jan

Transition of power

Fresh faces all around.
The new year brings with it new people in positions of authority in our local sphere, more than the normal transition of power we’re accustomed to every two to four years.
At the city, school, county, state and national level we welcome newcomers to the table, thanking them in advance for their willingness to serve. Challenges await our newly elected representatives, especially in Washington, and you have to give credit to the folks who have thrown themselves into the mix.
At City Hall, there will soon be three new faces at the city council table, and Mayor Dave Long, though a two-year veteran on the council, is adjusting to a new role. Dan Bartling and Dottie Anderson join the council as newcomers and within a month or so we can expect to see a new city administrator. That’s a significant level of change in leadership at all one time!

Wed
14
Jan

Gitmo begs question: Is this any way to run country

The recent improvement of Cuban and U.S. relations has not only brought up discussions between the two countries about tourism and trade topics, but also what to do with the Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba.
It appears the United States plans to keep the base that houses the world’s most expensive prison  with 127 war-on-terror captives and run by 2000 or more temporary troops and contractors. Now a $65 million school building with classroom space for 275 kindergarten through high school students is planned. That cost figures about $236,000 per student to put under one roof all the school-age children of American sailors stationed there.

Wed
07
Jan

Healthy goals

The new year begins with a new challenge.
Fresh off a holiday season overflowing with goodwill, good memories and way too much good food, the News-Register and Memorial Community Health Inc. are teaming up once again to provide some healthy motivation. The seventh annual Hamilton County Health Challenge is a go, kicking off in March and wrapping up 100 days later with an awards ceremony during A’ROR’N Days.
Each year since this program began, coordinators have considered whether to carry on for another season, and each year the answer has been yes. It’s rewarding to hear life-changing stories from participants who have gone all in with the challenge, and then posted amazing results just 100 days later. There have been many of those feel-good testimonials since this competition began in 2009.

Wed
07
Jan

Beginning new year with no regrets on 2014

Many of us looked back on 2014 and cited accomplishments and others took a viewpoint of regrets we had about 2014. I catch myself regretting things that I did, or didn’t do. New Year resolutions are one of those lists I fail to follow too closely. In fact, I don’t even make serious resolutions anymore.
However, there’s a good piece of advice I am going to try to follow, or at least consider in 2015. It came from a man named “Ben Holden.” Now I don’t know Ben, but his advice I feel is worth repeating. His advice was made several years ago when Ben said:
“I’ve decided I’m not going to focus on regrets I might have while looking back to the past year.
While I could have been smarter about some things, used better judgment when making certain decisions or maybe even taken advantage of opportunities that would have taken my life in a different direction, I refuse to let those issues have a negative impact on my life.

Wed
31
Dec

Worthwhile program

County commissioners sent a strong message last week with a unanimous vote in favor of designating Hamilton County as a “livestock friendly” home for agribusiness.
The promotional tag makes sense for Hamilton County, and much of rural Nebraska for that matter. Agriculture is king in the Husker state, after all, driving our economy with what has become more and more of a highly sophisticated, technical, diversified, multi-billion dollar industry. Anything we can do to distinguish ourselves as ag-friendly, both as a county and as a state, is well worth the time and effort.

Wed
31
Dec

Looking forward to new year, despite ‘special offer’

The end is near!
Yes, I know the end is near. The year 2014 is about to end and if we can last a few more days, we’ll be able to greet 2015. But, yesterday’s mail cast a doubt on my hopes to make it to 2015, or through the upcoming year.
As usual a letter will get your  interest when it is stamped, “Attention: Ronald Furse.” My attention was drawn a step further when I’m told that I may qualify for the Funeral Advantage Program.
Wait a minute! I’m feeling fine and really not interested in a program that will pay me up to $20,000 tax free as well as pay for my funeral expenses when putting me in the ground.
I was feeling fine and looking forward to the year 2015 and quite satisfied because I had survived 2014 with only a few nicks and scratches. Worst of all was the statement from the company that I already had been accepted by the program.

Wed
24
Dec

Ties that bind

Our hearts are full this holiday season as we pause and reflect during a most sacred season of the year.
It’s Christmas, a time to celebrate the greatest gift of all, the one we received so very long ago with the birth of the Christ child. We celebrate that gift of life and hope with a heartfelt prayer.
Amidst all the holiday cheer, gift exchanges and special gatherings, we hope there is time in all of our busy lives to focus on the true Christmas message. There is time, of course, if we choose to make it.
Christmas is such a remarkable day, when you stop to think about it.
No longer just a Christian day of celebration, Christmas and its themes of peace and goodwill toward men have crossed all religious boundaries. Those who profess a wide variety of religious beliefs, and even those who do not believe in a higher power, have come to celebrate Christmas in some form or fashion.

Wed
24
Dec

Some Christmas traditions change, fade with time

Another Christmas is about to be wrapped up. The betterhalf will amble through the house this weekend (if not before) and will put the Baby Jesus scene with its figurines back in the box until next Christmas.
Down will come the Christmas lighting strung across the fire place mantle. The gumdrop Santa house that’s devoid of most of the gumdrops that were gobbled up on Christmas Eve will be packed away. The long playing records featuring Christmas songs by Bing Crosby, Jo Stafford, Jim Nabors, The Christy Minstrels and Guy Lombardo have been silenced and the record player switched back to CDs and Country Western tunes will again echo throughout our household.
And finally the last twinkle of lights on our tree will fade as the artificial tree is boxed up and sent to the basement until next Christmas.

Wed
17
Dec

A feel-good tradition

It’s become a tradition; a warm, fuzzy slice of the Hamilton County holiday pie.
The edition you are reading today is more than just the latest version of all the local news that’s fit to print. It is a giant Christmas card from the community, to the community, filled with tidings of goodwill.
It reminds me so much of the giant basket that sat around the Johnson household while I was growing up. That basket was filled to the brim by Christmas Day with pictures of family and friends, cards from all over the country and letters highlighting the events of the previous year. I spent hours each year going through that treasure trove of holiday cheer, and still do today when we go visit my mother in Imperial during the holidays.
Even 30-plus years after I left home, there is a connection for me in that basket, a sense of home, all wrapped up in the spirit of the Christmas season.

Wed
17
Dec

December a mixed bag of angst, holiday cheer

A grandmother recently told the story about her grandson striving to complete his homework assignment. He came home from grade school and announced to his mother he must create a math problem essay that would utilize subtraction to display an answer that ended in four.
After a few minutes of writing he handed the sheet to his mother for approval. It read:
If I had eight liters of water and I had drank four, there would be only four liters left. But, then I had to pee.
The alarmed mother looked at his story problem and challenged the last line telling him it might not be appropriate.
The young student asked, “Why not?”... and  he concluded, “That’s an awfully lot of water!”
Some days a son’s homework can be pretty tough on a mom.
***

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Commentary