Commentary

Tue
28
Apr

Thoughts to live by that might make you smile

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Right now we’re reaching for something that can make us smile. We came cross the following that told us these were some observations that could start our day. Here we go:
“1. Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me either. Just leave me alone.
2. The journey of a thousand miles begins with a broken fan belt and a leaky tire.
3. It is always darkest before dawn, so if you’re going to steal your neighbor’s newspaper, do it then.
4. Don’t be irreplaceable. If you can’t be replaced, you can’t be promoted.
5. No one is listening until you speak something worthwhile.
6. Always you are unique. Just like everyone else.
7. Never test the depth of the water with both feet.
8. It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a bad example.
9. It is far more impressive when others discover your good qualities without your help.

Tue
21
Apr

Taxing entities must know ‘business as usual’ no longer a relevant term

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While initial efforts to fight back against the coronavirus pandemic are focused on preventing further spread and saving lives, and rightly so, reality has begun setting in as to the financial struggles looming ahead.
What we don’t know is how long this unprecedented economic slow-down will last here in Hamilton County,  Nebraska, across the nation and around the globe. What we do know with absolute certainty is that “business as usual” is no longer a relevant term.
Just one month into this crisis, local families as well as businesses large and small are being hit hard. We’ve seen tremendous resolve to keep employees on the payroll, look for creative ways to generate revenue and cut expenses, and somehow weather what we all hope will be a nightmare of a storm that ends soon. The good news is that Nebraska is weathering this storm far better than larger populated states, but the damage is still real, and very painful.

Tue
21
Apr

Offers on lost wedding ring include buy one get one

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A week ago I wrote I had lost a wedding band that had been on my finger for nearly 61 years. While it wasn’t “precious” as in terms of dollars, the silver band was precious in terms of the memories it represented.  
Judging by the comments I received, I also found anything with the implication of “wedding” or “romantic significance” got lots of attention ... and even a tale of another lost wedding band.
Willie Bergmark reported that he, too, had lost his wedding band a few months prior to my own loss. He did me one better, as his ring had been worn for over 62 years, or one year longer use than mine and unfortunately both Willie’s and my rings are still missing.
Adding to his report he noted that his wife LaDonna has come up with a solution to his and my misfortunes.

Wed
15
Apr

Healthcare workers deserve praise now more than ever

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With the coronavirus now having reached our community two words should be on the tip of all of our tongues when we cross pass with folks on the front lines of this global pandemic battle. Thank you!
As a supportive small town we have always been good about thanking our veterans, emergency responders and others who volunteer in countless ways. But now, in the midst of a global pandemic, the need to genuinely, openly, publicly and privately show love and support for healthcare workers near and far represents more than just a courteous gesture.
Doctors, nurses, paramedics, pharmacists and so many others in the healthcare industry who chose to devote their lives to helping people in need now need our support more than ever. Their work is always important, making us feel better if not potentially saving our lives, but the reality is that they may now, potentially, be putting their own lives at risk in the process.

Tue
14
Apr

Wedding finger feels naked after losing precious ring

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The past few weeks we’ve all been searching for something to take our minds off COVID-19, economic reports and other national and local concerns that have dumped a load of negative messages. I hope no one has gone to the extremes to change their personal concerns as I did about 10 days ago.
I have been noted to follow the idea, “If you are going to do something right – do it big time!” I certainly did. I lost my wedding ring.

Wed
08
Apr

Local headlines reflect proud, positive traditions

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A week ago we made the statement, “I’m proud to be a Nebraskan.” Now we would like to expand that statement, “I’m proud to be a ‘Hamilton County and an Aurora resident.’”
This past week’s headlines and stories in the Aurora News-Register reinforced those feelings.
Among those headlines: “Memorial Community Health officials report being ready to care for the community in face of an unprecedented pandemic; Aurora 4R rolls outline enrichment plan and reports positive start; Hamilton Community Foundation establishes COVID-19 Response Fund; Commissioners reaffirm March 18 state of emergency . . .; Hamilton County residents join ranks of handmade mask effort;.”
And the headlines continued with Edgerton Center staff  keeping education forward during closure; HPC board addresses pandemic during special meeting; and reports from our local business and institutions on how they are dealing with the coronavirus impact.

Wed
08
Apr

First local COVID-19 cases raise angst to whole new level

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The invisible enemy has arrived in Hamilton County.
The growing coronavirus pandemic has been a global story for months now, originating in China and slowly spreading its way one person, one nation at a time across the entire planet. It’s obviously affected all our lives in drastic ways, but until this week the impact seemed, quite literally, at least six feet away.
As of this week, COVID-19 is now, officially, a local crisis, though we’ve been warned that this deadly disease would eventually find its way here. It has, raising the angst and need for strict social distancing protocol to a whole new level.
Two things happened last week which deserve some serious thought and reflection. Health experts advise that the first few confirmed cases won’t be the last, so it’s important that we learn from and think about these lessons as a collective community.

Wed
01
Apr

COVID calm makes us proud to be Nebraskans

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April 1. 2020. April Fool’s Day . . . It may be “April Fool’s Day,” but we must be proud of the way Nebraskans have stepped up to the plate when the nation and our state is faced with the coronavirus.
Good old Nebraska; the medical staffs of our health care systems; the citizen volunteers who are sewing masks for health care staffs; corporate financial donors; as well as those citizens who obey the suggestions to follow the mandates of not purchasing excess of needed products; the mass awareness of washing hands to curtail the spread of the virus; and we can’t forget the fast action of the Nebraska Legislature to quickly, unanimously approve emergency funding to fight our battle.
Simply put, “We salute them all and say, ‘I’m proud to be a Nebraskan.’”
***

Wed
01
Apr

Cruisin’ event welcome therapy as area braces for growing threat

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“Cruisin’ the Square” never felt so good.
Though many folks driving around Aurora’s downtown square have likely never participated in that particular ritual, the emotions were somewhat raw Saturday during a feel-good event that could not have come at a better time. Our community misses each other in this midst of this coronavirus pandemic, it’s plain to see. So the chance to share a smile, a laugh and in many cases a tear, even just beyond arm’s length, was priceless therapy.
Teachers, especially, seemed eager to share a greeting with their students, many of whom they haven’t seen in weeks. Area school districts and families are starting to adjust to online enrichment programs, though it’s clearly not the same as the hands-on learning environment all are used to.

Wed
25
Mar

Virus gives little choice to but slow, way, down

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We can recall when my grandparents would comment they wished the world would just slow down a bit. Decades later we followed with the same comment. Now we’ve changed our mind. We had no idea it would take a world-wide spread of a coronavirus now known as COVID-19 to slow all of us down.
  The biggest frustration appears people are realizing they can’t have 100 percent control of their future. It has brought the reality to all of us we don’t appreciate some things until they are gone. A few weeks ago I made that same remark after a few of our meetings were cancelled.
  Also I repeated another comment that I heard: “You never appreciate what you have until it’s gone – toilet paper is a prime example.” Judging by grocery store reports it appears the near-empty store toilet paper shelves could be a prediction of that possibility.

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